UK Combat Academy

There is life beyond Jiu Jitsu, we just don't like to talk about it too much

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Postby Genghis » Sat Jun 03, 2006 7:24 pm | #31

To be honest Cullion, I'm pretty comfortable from other training about my ability to initial respond to non-telegraphed attacks (not that it can't always be improved of-course); it's the ability to tori/uke practice specific techniques against high grades that I was mostly looking for - particularly without having to travel too far (these chaps are about 10 minutes from my home).

And (a) I'm in it for the fun anyhow, and (b) I reserve the right to change my mind if I decide that I don't actually like what they're doing.

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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Postby cullion » Mon Jun 05, 2006 7:55 pm | #32

Genghis wrote:To be honest Cullion, I'm pretty comfortable from other training about my ability to initial respond to non-telegraphed attacks (not that it can't always be improved of-course); it's the ability to tori/uke practice specific techniques against high grades that I was mostly looking for - particularly without having to travel too far (these chaps are about 10 minutes from my home).

And (a) I'm in it for the fun anyhow, and (b) I reserve the right to change my mind if I decide that I don't actually like what they're doing.

G


Fair enough. It's just that knowing Marlowe isn't that far away I couldn't resist trying to tempt you over to where I train for a bit. You would love it.
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Postby Genghis » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:57 am | #33

cullion wrote:
Genghis wrote:To be honest Cullion, I'm pretty comfortable from other training about my ability to initial respond to non-telegraphed attacks (not that it can't always be improved of-course); it's the ability to tori/uke practice specific techniques against high grades that I was mostly looking for - particularly without having to travel too far (these chaps are about 10 minutes from my home).

And (a) I'm in it for the fun anyhow, and (b) I reserve the right to change my mind if I decide that I don't actually like what they're doing.

G


Fair enough. It's just that knowing Marlowe isn't that far away I couldn't resist trying to tempt you over to where I train for a bit. You would love it.


Right now I'm at saturation, although I'm sure I'll get a chance to see your style at the next PJ/SS or similar seminar.

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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Postby cullion » Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:24 am | #34

Genghis wrote:
cullion wrote:
Genghis wrote:To be honest Cullion, I'm pretty comfortable from other training about my ability to initial respond to non-telegraphed attacks (not that it can't always be improved of-course); it's the ability to tori/uke practice specific techniques against high grades that I was mostly looking for - particularly without having to travel too far (these chaps are about 10 minutes from my home).

And (a) I'm in it for the fun anyhow, and (b) I reserve the right to change my mind if I decide that I don't actually like what they're doing.

G


Fair enough. It's just that knowing Marlowe isn't that far away I couldn't resist trying to tempt you over to where I train for a bit. You would love it.


Right now I'm at saturation, although I'm sure I'll get a chance to see your style at the next PJ/SS or similar seminar.

G


I hope to make it to one, although if you want to see a good example of the style, you'd be better off seeing the class. Or having a look at the clips on the website.
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Postby Genghis » Fri Jun 30, 2006 8:29 am | #35

Well, having trained with these chaps for a bit, and enjoyed myself, last night I told the sensei that I'd not be returning.  I should add, very politely and amicably, with invitations to come and train any time issued in both directions.

Why did I decide it wasn't for me:

(1) "Sensei", "Rei", "Randori".  I have now exhausted their entire stock of Japanese!

(2) The session is about 40% fitness work, that's a higher proportion than personally I feel appropriate - I wanna do Jiu Jitsu!  (Notwithstanding that they're all very fit, which must be a good thing)

(3) Although they're very open to hearing my opinions, the chaps have never formally included pressure points in their work, so it's hard to have much of a dialogue about them.

(4) Now they're past grading, it's about 50/50 Jiu Jitsu and kickboxing - the latter doesn't really suit me, as well as meaning that the total Jiu Jitsu content of a session is under 1/3rd, which is a bit small.

(5) Anyhow, it frees up an evening a week, and I just discovered that one of my colleagues at work is a 1st Kyu in Shorinji Kempo, and he's invited me to go and train.


Overall, my time wasn't wasted, and I have to say that although it's limited, what Jiu Jitsu these chaps learn (the actual technique execution) is pretty good, and their fluency in kickboxing is much better than their Jiu Jitsu fluency, and I'm sure they can be transferred.  If you want to get seriously fit, I'd particularly recommend them to anybody.  They're also thoroughly nice chaps to train with.

But not for me right now.

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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Postby Goober » Fri Jun 30, 2006 10:34 am | #36

theres a first Kyu in Shorinji Kempo in the Engineering Dept at Brunel as well as you? Who is it?

Must be one of the arse kickingest departments on campus!
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Postby Genghis » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:14 am | #37

Goober wrote:theres a first Kyu in Shorinji Kempo in the Engineering Dept at Brunel as well as you? Who is it?

Must be one of the arse kickingest departments on campus!


New chap, Dr Mark Young, expert in transport ergonomics.

Actually, Dr. Romeo Glovnea is a 4th Dan in Shotokan, and Dr. Cris Mares has a dan grade in (I think) TKD, so as you say we're a pretty arse-kicking department.

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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Postby Goober » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:25 am | #38

Strange how the 4th dan shotokan bloke doesn't train with the Brunel Shotokan club, the TKD guy doesn't train with the TKD club, and neither you nor the Shorinji guy have come along to a Jitsu session.. :roll: Lecturers!
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Postby Genghis » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:01 pm | #39

To be frank, I think (as do most of my colleagues) that it interferes with the student:teacher relationship.  

That's the reason why we tend to train elsewhere - so I'm running a dojo in Marlow, Mark is training at a dojo in Harrow, and Romeo hasn't trained since he came here from Romania last year.  Similarly lecturers tend not to drink in the campus bars, join other social clubs, etc.

Also, it's bad for the soul being reminded how old we're getting in the company of 18 and 19 year olds.

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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Postby Goober » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:13 pm | #40

I suppose so.. I think that sometimes people have a too overly formal relationship between students and lecturers, after all its not school anymore. People learn better and will ultimately foster better mutual respect if they don't have such boundaries between them.
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Postby Genghis » Fri Jun 30, 2006 1:08 pm | #41

Goober wrote:I suppose so.. I think that sometimes people have a too overly formal relationship between students and lecturers, after all its not school anymore. People learn better and will ultimately foster better mutual respect if they don't have such boundaries between them.


We're getting seriously :ot: here, but who cares.

Personally, I don't find that the case.  I find that excessive familiarity tends to lead students to feel too much that they'll get away with lack of effort where they shouldn't, and makes lecturers feel that they can't be forceful over important issues where they should.

This is not to say that first names, friendliness and a degree of banter aren't fine - within limits.  But you've got to maintain a formality in the student/teacher relationship, just as you sometimes have to in a dojo, learning to fly, learning to drive...

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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Postby Swiss Miss » Fri Jun 30, 2006 2:54 pm | #42

Genghis wrote:
Goober wrote:I suppose so.. I think that sometimes people have a too overly formal relationship between students and lecturers, after all its not school anymore. People learn better and will ultimately foster better mutual respect if they don't have such boundaries between them.


We're getting seriously :ot: here, but who cares.

Personally, I don't find that the case.  I find that excessive familiarity tends to lead students to feel too much that they'll get away with lack of effort where they shouldn't, and makes lecturers feel that they can't be forceful over important issues where they should.

This is not to say that first names, friendliness and a degree of banter aren't fine - within limits.  But you've got to maintain a formality in the student/teacher relationship, just as you sometimes have to in a dojo, learning to fly, learning to drive...

G


sorry for maintaining the general offtopicness - I lecture and train at the same university but I'm very happy that so far there's been no cross-over  -- none of my students do jitsu (actually a couple turned up to a session once and I wound up teaching them for that too!). I'm not sure what I'd do if some did - probably it would be okay since I'd be a higher grade than them anyway but it is something I hope doesn't happen... I'd like to keep my general craziness from my students!

:lol:
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Postby Goober » Fri Jun 30, 2006 2:59 pm | #43

Genghis wrote:
Goober wrote:I suppose so.. I think that sometimes people have a too overly formal relationship between students and lecturers, after all its not school anymore. People learn better and will ultimately foster better mutual respect if they don't have such boundaries between them.


We're getting seriously :ot: here, but who cares.

Personally, I don't find that the case.  I find that excessive familiarity tends to lead students to feel too much that they'll get away with lack of effort where they shouldn't, and makes lecturers feel that they can't be forceful over important issues where they should.

This is not to say that first names, friendliness and a degree of banter aren't fine - within limits.  But you've got to maintain a formality in the student/teacher relationship, just as you sometimes have to in a dojo, learning to fly, learning to drive...

G


Meh, i can see your point, but frankly don't think that joining in with a martial arts club should cause that problem. Especially as we only have 2 or 3 student members at the moment anyway..
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Postby Clueless » Fri Jun 30, 2006 4:26 pm | #44

Genghis wrote:Similarly lecturers tend not to drink in the campus bars, join other social clubs, etc.


Pfft. Never came to UMIST did you? I couldn't count on both hands the number of lecturers I've been drinking with...well, maybe just... (many while I was a second year undergrad). I do think it would be really weird if I had to train with them though - I'd happily go drinking with most people but i'd be more selective about training. You need to develop a level of trust with your training partners that just makes the whole thing more personal.  :?
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Postby Genghis » Fri Jun 30, 2006 5:17 pm | #45

Clueless wrote:You need to develop a level of trust with your training partners that just makes the whole thing more personal.  :?


That's basically it.  I find it helps if my students regard me as an evil and uncompromising bastard. (Not sure mind if this explains the huge queue of them who wanted me as their final year dissertation tutor for next year).

G
Wrestle well, skillfully wield spear, sword, and dagger in a manly way.  Strike true and hard and rush in - those who understand this will despise the one who defends.  (Sigmund Ringeck, C15)

http://www.buckskempo.org.uk/
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