Parkour

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Parkour

Postby captaintau » Fri Nov 26, 2010 5:09 pm | #1

This was raised on another thread and I think is very relevent to Martial Arts discussion. It's a dojo cliché that the best form of self defence is "running away". Yet how many clubs actively train for this? We don't. Parkour do market themselves as a Martial Art with the purpose of running to or from something as quicly and efficiently as possible, unlike Free Running in which aethetics and fun is embraced (ironically like many of today's Martial Arts!)

What's your view on Parkour and do you think it could have a role in your training?
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Re: Parkour

Postby Goober » Fri Nov 26, 2010 5:33 pm | #2

captaintau wrote:What's your view on Parkour and do you think it could have a role in your training?


Intentional pun, or a spelling mistake from the forum sp/grammar nazi??

I can't decide...

:?  :P

-----------

In answer to the question, I think that Parkour is perfectly good at doing what it does and that it has "self defence" applications. However, if people want to learn it, they can go and learn it, shoe-horning it into ju-jitsu classes so that you can then pretend you are a bit more "self defence" oriented than other martial arts, seems like a pointless waste of time to me.
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Re: Parkour

Postby captaintau » Fri Nov 26, 2010 6:56 pm | #3

Goober wrote:
captaintau wrote:What's your view on Parkour and do you think it could have a role in your training?


Intentional pun, or a spelling mistake from the forum sp/grammar nazi??

I can't decide...

:?  :P


:-?
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Re: Parkour

Postby Nazareth » Fri Nov 26, 2010 9:26 pm | #4

What mistake? Role / roll? CT spelled the right word correctly...

I considered learning parkour but will be somewhat hindered in my present location.

I believe at least one TJF 3rd Dan is learning Parkour though!
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Re: Parkour

Postby ToffeeApple » Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:12 pm | #5

Goober wrote:
captaintau wrote:What's your view on Parkour and do you think it could have a role in your training?


Intentional pun, or a spelling mistake from the forum sp/grammar nazi??
I second the :?


I also think you'd be far better off spending the time indoors or at a target range or getting a massage or something.  When you start talking about practicing parkour to improve your running away, you have gone into the world of wider self-defence where I think there are better things you could be doing.  Things like travelling in convoy, carrying a maple leaf brooch if you're a yank, sending your kids back to europe if Israel is posturing again, or to their uncle if they start getting in trouble "in the neighbourhood".
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Re: Parkour

Postby nz_ROB » Sat Nov 27, 2010 7:40 am | #6

captaintau wrote:What's your view on Parkour and do you think it could have a role in your training?

I have never trained in Parkour or even seen a training session in it so cannot say whether it's training routines would be of any assistance or otherwise to my martial arts training.

I have a number of training routines that I use to help me with improving my speed and agility .. interval training, plyometrics, and resistance can all play a part. I personally believe it boils down to individual training routine rather than practising a specific "sport". Unless I was seeking social interaction and like-minded companionship instead.
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Re: Parkour

Postby Jitsonic » Sat Nov 27, 2010 5:25 pm | #7

My 2p's worth - I initially raised it a little in jest but actually I think there is some truth in what I said.

A 'good' Parkour practitioner (a Traceur/Traceuse) will have developed very good strength and fitness just through the nature of the training.  In a self-defence situation, this is undoubtedly a good thing.  They will also no doubt develop explosive power through the training, and while they may not actively train punching and kicking, I certainly wouldn't like to be punched by an angry Traceur.

In addition they will have developed supreme spatial awareness and agility - that's incredibly useful when running away or trying to get out of a situation.

I also think that a lot of these guys and gals must, over time, grow a massive set of cojones while attempting to overcome the physical obstacles in their practice.  They do say that fighting is 90% mental and 10% physical - I don't always agree with that ratio but having a strong mind in a self-defence situation undoubtedly helps (talking down, psyching out, knowing when to back down/escape is all in the mind...)

The original point made by CT is valid I think:

Parkour do market themselves as a Martial Art with the purpose of running to or from something as quicly and efficiently as possible, unlike Free Running in which aethetics and fun is embraced (ironically like many of today's Martial Arts!)


I wasn't actually aware that Parkour market themselves as an MA - but if they do, it's no less valid an MA than a solely striking/grappling art, in my opinion.  We distinguish between striking arts and grappling arts in MA, but perhaps there's another category for "running" or "escaping" arts.  

In terms of Parkour vs Freerunning, I very much agree that this is like a lot of today's MA; in fact using TJF as an example, you have your O Soto Gari and Uke Goshi etc as your "fighting" throws, versus your Shiho Nage, Yoko Wakare, Kani Basami as your more fun "showy" throws...

This is an interesting debate!
Last edited by Jitsonic on Sat Nov 27, 2010 5:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Parkour

Postby Urban Fisherman » Sat Nov 27, 2010 8:30 pm | #8

Jitsonic wrote:
Parkour do market themselves as a Martial Art with the purpose of running to or from something as quicly and efficiently as possible, unlike Free Running in which aethetics and fun is embraced (ironically like many of today's Martial Arts!)


I wasn't actually aware that Parkour market themselves as an MA - but if they do, it's no less valid an MA than a solely striking/grappling art, in my opinion.  We distinguish between striking arts and grappling arts in MA, but perhaps there's another category for "running" or "escaping" arts.

There's a closely related art of "Tricking", which is possibily where the confusion arises. According to wikipedia, David Belle doesn't consider tricking part of parkour, probably many traceurs are less purist.

When I was playing capoeira contemporanea, which is perhaps the closest other martial art to tricking, Tricks Tutorials, but it appears to be undergoing maintenance. After three years of training, I'm not convinced that capoeira contemporanea is very practical or useful compared to arts with a focus on fighting in the ring like muay thai, and the same applies to tricking. Although if you're doing capoeira because you think it's a highly practical martial art then I think you're missing the point.

As for parkour's martial applicability, punching is a pretty technical skill, with a lot of different components: avoiding telegraphing, getting maximal effective mass, timing, distance, choice of the correct punch in a given situation, etc. Parkour's not  going help much with these skills however impressive the tracuer's fitness. If you survive the initial attack then parkour is probably good for getting away, and acrobatic moves might give you space to start running if your attacker is startled for a second.
"We must plan for freedom, and not only for security, if for no other reason than that only freedom can make security secure." Karl Popper
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Re: Parkour

Postby Goober » Mon Nov 29, 2010 10:12 am | #9

captaintau wrote:
Goober wrote:
captaintau wrote:What's your view on Parkour and do you think it could have a role in your training?


Intentional pun, or a spelling mistake from the forum sp/grammar nazi??

I can't decide...

:?  :P


:-?


You edited my post you cheeky sod...  :lol:   :cuss:
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Re: Parkour

Postby Nazareth » Fri Dec 03, 2010 6:27 pm | #10

:lol:
"We do not stop playing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop playing."
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Re: Parkour

Postby Urban Fisherman » Thu Dec 23, 2010 9:43 am | #11

Parkour style cage fighting kick:

"We must plan for freedom, and not only for security, if for no other reason than that only freedom can make security secure." Karl Popper
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Re: Parkour

Postby Hirsty » Thu Dec 23, 2010 8:04 pm | #12

That's pretty cool - if only he could do it in bullet time!
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Re: Parkour

Postby Kway » Sun Jan 30, 2011 10:30 pm | #13

I've recently started training Ju jitsu in Andover and this week plan to start Parkour, too.

I think it will be mentally and physically beneficial towards my training, for each will compliment another.
I went in Ju jitsu for confidence, fitness, mental & physical focus, and to learn how to defend myself.
Parkour philosophy seems mainly to revolve around the aspect of freedom; conquering fear and obstacles.
I admire fluency in motion, like dancing, a good rhythm in anything is important, it's a way of life.
I'm looking forward to the application of each in my own rhythm.

Parkour is a mental de-conditioning; through our lives, we observe and label. We label a wall as a preventative, bars as an obstruction, hight and length become objectively 'dangerous'. We measure and compare and we create our fundamental premise for our abilities. Parkour teaches us to look beyond these labels and limitations, we gain more freedom, mentally and physically, and it can be applied to all areas of life.
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Re: Parkour

Postby Matt NZ » Mon Jan 31, 2011 1:22 am | #14

Thats awesome.  I've seen a superman punch off the cage, but that trumps hands down
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