GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby Hirsty » Sat Feb 11, 2012 4:35 pm | #496

Who here is willing to risk it?
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby ToffeeApple » Sat Feb 11, 2012 6:02 pm | #497

nry:  this is what I was thinking of before.  I've seen some other stuff on related topics elsewhere.  It's about reactive pathways or somesuch, and is relevant to your current theories on self-defence, from both the attacker & defender's pov.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/ne ... 493203.stm

*as 'guns' are being discussed here, this is where I've posted it, however you should pretend that I also posted this in the latest 'self defence' thread.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby nry » Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:54 pm | #498

captaintau wrote:
nry wrote:
captaintau wrote:At point blank range you can't reach the gunner. However you can move far quicker than they can re-aquire the target.

Of course you can reach the gunner, they are at the other end of the gun which is pointed and touching your chest/head/torso!?  I've tried it enough times with a cap gun etc., they can't get a shot off before you have them.

Gunner is six foot away. How else are they going to fire the gun?


6 feet away is not point blank range...at 6 foot you're screwed!
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby nry » Sat Feb 11, 2012 8:57 pm | #499

ToffeeApple wrote:nry:  this is what I was thinking of before.  I've seen some other stuff on related topics elsewhere.  It's about reactive pathways or somesuch, and is relevant to your current theories on self-defence, from both the attacker & defender's pov.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/today/hi/today/ne ... 493203.stm

*as 'guns' are being discussed here, this is where I've posted it, however you should pretend that I also posted this in the latest 'self defence' thread.


Interesting...I wonder on any other studies under stress/adrenaline dumps.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby captaintau » Sat Feb 11, 2012 10:03 pm | #500

nry wrote:
captaintau wrote:
nry wrote:Of course you can reach the gunner, they are at the other end of the gun which is pointed and touching your chest/head/torso!?  I've tried it enough times with a cap gun etc., they can't get a shot off before you have them.

Gunner is six foot away. How else are they going to fire the gun?

6 feet away is not point blank range...at 6 foot you're screwed!

6 foot is point blank range for a gun, give or take. You aren't screwed, just move a little as it takes time to re-acquire the target.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby ToffeeApple » Sat Feb 11, 2012 10:41 pm | #501

captaintau wrote:
nry wrote:6 feet away is not point blank range...at 6 foot you're screwed!

6 foot is point blank range for a gun, give or take.


Give quite a bit further than that, no?  Unless by gun you mean cannon.  In one respect, he is correct.  At 6ft, you're screwed.





Rather appropriate I thought, the Admiral had it right - this thread is basically one big trap.  Anyway.  Guns are the least of your worries when slingshots are common toys for boys everywhere.
Last edited by captaintau on Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:16 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Fixed the YouTube link.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby Snowpoll » Wed Dec 05, 2012 8:44 am | #502

I decided I should weigh in on this discussion as I have worked for GKR in the past .  
The club started in South Australia some 25+ years ago by Shihan Robert (Bob) Sullivan, an ex police officer, with a sound background in karate (2nd or 3rd Dan Goju I believe it was).
His concept was simple, get as many people to "Try" karate as possible, with minimal cost for them to try,  and those that like it would stay.
The emphasis was for fitness and basic self defense using a traditional style of karate, He developed GKR based on Goju and Shodokan techniques and principles.

He knew that if he was giving a lot of people the opportunity try martial arts, that there would be a high attrition rate, as it isnt for everyone, but the idea was to bring it to the masses that may not have thought of it as an avenue to fitness before. and so the door to door technique of advertising and sales was adopted. over the next 10 years or so it was developed and tweeked so that with minimal training and minimal to no sales experience, just about anyone could do it and with a little effort make a reasonable living while training to be a regional manager or instructor. when i worked for GKR (about 15 years ago) I averaged $400-600pw,  not a bad income at that time. my best week with them was $1000. the beauty of the system is that people move and multiply, and their lifestyle situation changes from one year to the next, so an area that is canvased for potential students, is ready to be canvased again about 6-9 months later. someone that wasnt interested then may be now etc.  

students that were good and interested in progressing were often approached to do senior training to become assistant instructors and then instructors themselves if they were interested.

people canvasing for the club were being groomed and trained to become regional managers and instructors to expand the club and take it to new areas.

after about 10 years (roughly 1994) the club expend to Sydney ( New South Wales, Australia) with its first region outside of Adelaide opened. after that the club expanded quickly setting up regions in most of the Australian capitals then expanding out to New Zealand and the UK...

you may not like the marketing techniques used by the club, but they are effective, and they open the possibility of learning martial arts  to many people that have never even considered doing so. some of the best martial artists i have met were people that had never thought of doing it, were shown what its about and thought , what the hell,,  ill give it a go and see if i like it..  

sales and martial arts are  not for everyone, and the quality of GKR training does vary from region to region, and dojo to dojo, depending on the individual instructors and   regional managers involved, however the club senior management does its best to maintain a good quality and consistency across the board.  ( isnt every club with different instructors in the same boat there? )

I hope this post sheds some more light on the issue for anyone looking at joining a martial arts club and considering GKR.. weather it be for training or a position withing the organisation.  
ohh  for reference ,,  in my year and a half with the club i reached 3rd Kyu brown belt.   training 3 time /week every week and some weekends
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby rne02 » Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:04 pm | #503

Snowpoll wrote:and they open the possibility of learning martial arts  to many people that have never even considered doing so.

But they are not learning Martial Arts.  GKR is non-contact, how can you have a non-contact martial art?  Surely that's the very definition of an oxymoron?  

It's like the episode of The Big Bang Theory where Sheldon says he learnt to swim by watching instructional video's on the internet and practising on the living room floor, arguing that "the skills are transferable".
If you can't do it with a fag or a shot glass in your other hand, it's not a proper judo hold.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby captaintau » Thu Dec 06, 2012 1:50 pm | #504

rne02 wrote:But they are not learning Martial Arts.  GKR is non-contact, how can you have a non-contact martial art?  Surely that's the very definition of an oxymoron?  

T'ai Chi?
Capoeira?

It depends on how you define "Martial Art." Personally I more time for non-contact T'ai Chi that has sound basis in pragmatism than Taekwondo which I believe is the most practiced Martial Art in the world, isn't non-contact and despite the beliefs of it's Masters bears no relation to reality.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby Snowpoll » Mon Jan 14, 2013 12:14 pm | #505

rne02 wrote:But they are not learning Martial Arts.  GKR is non-contact, how can you have a non-contact martial art?  Surely that's the very definition of an oxymoron?  ".


I would have to disagree. students are taught to control their strikes and the distance they are striking to. in practice, to just touch or just miss the opponent. however they are taught that when in a real situation they should aim to strike through the opponent. to enable them to enact on this they  are advised to undertake makawari  or bag training at home.

to directly address your quote though,,   i would suggest that by your reasoning, anyone that does firearms training with a view to needing to defend themselves would have to practice on 'live' human targets, otherwise how are they supposed to actually shoot someone if the need arise ...   8O
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby nry » Mon Jan 14, 2013 2:38 pm | #506

Because a bag doesn't move or fight back...and for firearm training it is more than possible to train with live people providing the ammunition is appropriate i.e. not live rounds for example.

Training to 'not hit' is instilling that in the monkey part of the brain - this is the bit that works under stress, so you may well be training people not to hit/strike an attacker, their monkey brain will do what their training has built into an instinctive reaction.

There are rumours all over the place where a 'karate' practitioner has ended up being attacked only to 'hit' the attacker as they've been trained...to find they pulled the strike.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby rne02 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 4:17 pm | #507

nry wrote:Training to 'not hit' is instilling that in the monkey part of the brain - this is the bit that works under stress, so you may well be training people not to hit/strike an attacker, their monkey brain will do what their training has built into an instinctive reaction.

There are rumours all over the place where a 'karate' practitioner has ended up being attacked only to 'hit' the attacker as they've been trained...to find they pulled the strike.

I have had this very conversation with Karate-ka and can fully understand it having trained it myself.  You are taught to strike from such a distance so that once your punch or kick is fully extended it barely makes contact with Uke.  Building this into you muscle memory means that is exactly how you will react when you call upon your skills.

The last such conversation I have I was told they threw a punch in a pub and then thought "Why is he still standing" before being hit back and finding themselves on the floor.
If you can't do it with a fag or a shot glass in your other hand, it's not a proper judo hold.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby nry » Mon Jan 14, 2013 10:40 pm | #508

That conversation seems like an urban myth, it's the same one I've been told by a few different people :)
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby OneDragons » Mon Jan 14, 2013 11:52 pm | #509

The problem with this 'urban myth' is that you keep hearing it from different people so you can't trace it's origin.

In this case I think it is because it spontaneously comes from lots of different people without any direct link. As in it is so true lot's of different people have had the same experience. As it happens I was talking to an instructor two weeks ago (guy I trust) who told me that this happened to him on a night out, it took him a few seconds to figure out why the other guy wasn't out cold following his blood curdling cries and accurate strikes. Then the other guy gave him a kicking. Fortunately for him, he is a meat head and he managed to recover and started throwing some real punches.

But he never forgot the moment he realised his Karate training had limitations.
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Re: GKR Karate - Good or bad organisation?

Postby gorjussmummy » Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:07 pm | #510

Hi all,

ive just joined this site after reading these comments, my 8yr old son has just joined GKR, and a few of his mates from school, we first heard about it after a knock at the door, in January.(heavily snowing)
My son really wanted to join so I paid the joining fee, £25, and then hes been attending every Thursday since, at £6.50. on the 4th visit, I paid for a gi (please excuse me as I don't know much about it and still learning) 7 weeks later we still don't have it, and keep being told, they cannot get hold of the person who I assume they are buying them/stockist. I am a mother of 3 boys and have to work hard to pay for their after school activities, I don't want to be ripped off. also can anyone tell me how much a grading cost, my son has his 1st in a few weeks, and they said its £20 plus £5 for his belt?
any information would be gratefully appreciated, as I don't want to be ripped off or for my son not to be going anywhere with this as he really enjoys going
thank you
amie
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