10 Most Common Street Attacks

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10 Most Common Street Attacks

Postby nao » Wed Jun 09, 2010 1:25 pm | #1

What are the 10 most common street attacks?

Here's a list of 20 common attacks I found, but there's no source cited so I'm wondering if it's just someone's opinion?

  1. Wrist/Arm Grabs.
  2. Lapel or collar grab.
  3. Lapel Grab and Sucker Punch.
  4. Front Choke.
  5. Rear Choke.
  6. Roundhouse Punch.
  7. Front Bear Hug.
  8. Rear Bear Hug.
  9. Side Headlock and Punch.
 10. Hair Pull.
 11. Charge and Tackle.
 12. Front Headlock.
 13. Rear Strangle Hold.
 14. Overhead Strike with Weapon.
 15. Bad Guy In Mount (straddling the chest), Victim’s (Woman) Hands Pinned To Ground.
 16. Ground and Pound from the Mount Position.
 17. Choke From Mount Position.
 18. Choke From Guard Position (Man in between woman’s legs, on the ground).
 19. First In-First Out (attacks when victim is first going in or first coming out of a car, garage, house, etc.).
 20. Bear Hug From Rear/Objective is to pick woman up and carry her off.

Cheers!
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Postby jitsukerr » Wed Jun 09, 2010 2:10 pm | #2

I remember that the 5 most common attacks for men and women were posted a while back.  Creepily, the top attacks for women all involved being dragged off somewhere.
The typical English reaction to any change is to be negative. Then it is to accept it, then cheer about it, then claim you invented it.
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Postby eugenemcfadden » Wed Jun 09, 2010 2:25 pm | #3

Habitual Acts of Violence or HAOV.

which is to say, acts of violence that tend to occur and how they occur.  The list below is most common on down.  

Been a fair bit of research on this by the home office and people like Pat MacCarthy.

http://www.kitsunekan.com/articles/jeffnashhaov.php


From the website:

Habitual Acts of Violence: Part One
Male on Male, Close Quarters.
These are listed in frequency order.
1. One person pushes, hands to chest, which is normally followed by the pushee striking first, to the head.
2. A swinging punch to the head.
3. A front clothing grab, one handed, followed by punch to the head.
4. A front clothing grab, two hands, followed by a head butt.
5. A front clothing grab, two hands, followed by a knee to the groin.
6. A bottle, glass, or ashtray to the head.
7. A lashing kick to groin/lower legs.
8.A broken bottle/glass jabbed to face.
9. A slash with knife, most commonly a 3 to 4"lockblade knife or kitchen utility knife. (Apart from muggings, sexual assaults and gang violence, the hunting/combat type knife is seldom used)
10.A grappling style head lock.

Also a good reference is Sgt Rory Miller and Marc MacYoung who talk about The Monkey Dance, which is violence that is geared into our evolutionary inheritance; dominance violence, that sort of thing, violence which rarely results in major damage.
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Postby captaintau » Wed Jun 09, 2010 3:44 pm | #4

My experience of treating assault victims is, according to their version of events, is simply unpredictable punches out of nowhere.
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Postby nao » Thu Jun 10, 2010 3:25 pm | #5

HAOV was a very interesting read, thanks Eugene!  :ok:

The top 5 seem to be more or less the same in all the lists I've read so far (including a very interesting Central London Krav Maga syllabus that's based on 'the top 10 street attacks')

From a TJF Jitsuka perspective, I find the list reads like the grading requirements for the first 5 kyu. It's reassuring that defence against most of the top 10 most common attacks are drilled regularly. I feel I now have a better appreciation of why we are asked as Uke to strike properly and what a disservice it is to Tori if we do not Uke to the best of our ability.

captaintau wrote:My experience of treating assault victims is, according to their version of events, is simply unpredictable punches out of nowhere.
I wonder what sort of body language is involved imminently before an attack?

Thanks.
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Postby Pocahontas » Thu Jun 10, 2010 3:33 pm | #6

nao wrote: I feel I now have a better appreciation of why we are asked as Uke to strike properly and what a disservice it is to Tori if we do not Uke to the best of our ability.

I was told off for attacking 'weirdly' with a knife in training once. Thing is...that's how I would attack with a knife in real life, no idea what I did that was different as it was what felt natural to me!  :?
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Postby eugenemcfadden » Thu Jun 10, 2010 3:51 pm | #7

no worries nao.
Regarding body language before an attack

http://www.wellsphere.com/martial-arts- ... nce/814127

Pocahontas -

"you're stabbing me wrongly!"

This is the problem I have with most knife defences, a lot of them rely upon an attack that just wouldn't happen and then the attacker needs to leave his attacking hand stationary so you can do your technique.

Also annoying are the "knife threats" that are, again, not how anyone with the slightest common sense would threaten with a knife.  

Eugene McFadden

(any spelling mistakes please forgive as, due to a contact lens issue, I'm operating with one eye at the moment)
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Postby BrassMan » Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:37 pm | #8

nao wrote:
captaintau wrote:My experience of treating assault victims is, according to their version of events, is simply unpredictable punches out of nowhere.
I wonder what sort of body language is involved imminently before an attack?

Thanks.


And how much drinking?
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Postby Yojimbo » Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:59 pm | #9

A few sites have the following '5 stages of violence' stuff on them:

'1. Intent
His own body will tell you he's about to attack -- even if his words are deceptively calm and normal.

2. Interview
This is where the criminal decides if you are safe to attack.

3. Positioning
The closer a criminal gets, the greater his ability to overwhelm and control.

4. Attack
The actual attack occurs and now you have to make a decision

5.Reaction
Reaction is how the criminal feels about what he has done. In the aftermath of robbing someone, the criminal decides, on a whim, to shoot the person.

Basically, most of this occurs within the first few minutes of sighting the potential victim, and the decision to move towards violence is made early on - though many 'career' criminals are looking for easy targets and may not want to use violence. Some situations are excalated by the response of the target (essentially, the criminal doesn't want to use violence, but will if put in an aggressive situation).
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Postby nao » Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:21 pm | #10

eugenemcfadden wrote:Regarding body language before an attack

http://www.wellsphere.com/martial-arts- ... nce/814127
Cheers for that. Here's an excerpt from 'The Monkey Dance':

1) Eye contact, hard stare.
2) Verbal challenge: "What you lookin' at?"
3) Close distance. Sometimes there is chest bumping.
4) Finger poke or two-handed push to the chest.
5) Dominant hand roundhouse punch.


The author goes on to explain that you can break the ritual by beating the aggressor to step 5 -  which is another way of saying, strike pre-emptively.

I wonder what the difference is, legally, between a pre-emptive strike at step 3 vs a pre-emptive strike at step 4?

The bit about groups of attackers was very interesting. I never thought that, in a group attack, the group members are most likely using you to prove themselves to each other. I guess an analogy of this is when a group of people make jokes at your expense.

The Predatory Violence bit was especially interesting - do you think it's plausible that your heart rate will rocket past 175 bpm on the initial, surprise attack? I had never thought about this before - you probably need extensive mental conditioning to deal with violent situations, don't you? To me, this is like when your body releases too much histamine - it's a reaction that is difficult to control and can be ultimately life threatening.

Hardcore.

Nao
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Postby captaintau » Fri Jun 11, 2010 11:12 pm | #11

nao wrote:
1) Eye contact, hard stare.
2) Verbal challenge: "What you lookin' at?"
3) Close distance. Sometimes there is chest bumping.
4) Finger poke or two-handed push to the chest.
5) Dominant hand roundhouse punch.


The author goes on to explain that you can break the ritual by beating the aggressor to step 5 -  which is another way of saying, strike pre-emptively.

I wonder what the difference is, legally, between a pre-emptive strike at step 3 vs a pre-emptive strike at step 4?


In theory, you could legally pre-emptively strike at stage 2, as long as a definate threat is there. IE, instead of "what you lookin' at" you get "I'm gunna take your *beep* head off, you *beep*". Then their intent is clear.
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Postby Jitsonic » Sat Jun 12, 2010 4:49 pm | #12

As an aside, has anyone done ever used/taught Geoff Thompson's Fence technique in self-defence situations? Any comments on the below video? (rated 15 - one use of the word 'f**k'...:))

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Postby Hirsty » Sat Jun 12, 2010 8:33 pm | #13

The fence is an amazing technique and something I teach all of the time.  It is something I was taught (but did not have a name) way before I'd heard of Geoff Thompson and I believe he states that he just named it as opposed to claiming to have invented it.

Sorry, didn't have time to watch the video but I would rate as worthy of lots of practice for anyone even remotely interested in self defence.
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Postby jitsukerr » Mon Jun 14, 2010 2:02 pm | #14

I agree, it's a hugely important concept and one which has surfaced again and again when talking about unarmed confrontations.  Thompson's take on it has the advantage of simplicity to go with the effectiveness of the concept on its own.
The typical English reaction to any change is to be negative. Then it is to accept it, then cheer about it, then claim you invented it.
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Postby nao » Tue Jun 15, 2010 4:00 pm | #15

I wonder, could you practice variations of the fence in a Dojo or would the swearing bit make that a no-no?

Actually, for something like the fence, could swearing be justified in the Dojo?  :thinking:
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